The Canadian Light Source (CLS) is a third-generation 2.9 GeV synchrotron located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. It opened on October 22, 2004 after three years of construction and cost C$173.5 million. One of forty-two such facilities in the world, it occupies a footprint the size of a football field on the grounds of the University of Saskatchewan. The CLS, which is the only synchrotron in Canada, is operated by CLS Inc. a not-for-profit corporation owned by the University of Saskatchewan.

Address
Saskatoon, Canada, Canada
Website
http://www.lightsource.ca/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Light_Source

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Identifying the best chickpea crops for cattle feed

While hummus used to be an exotic spread enjoyed only in the Middle East, it has become a staple in grocery stores throughout the world. Recently, the savory dish has gained popularity amongst a new fan base: herds of cows.

Scientists find harmful chemicals in household dust

Since the 1970s, chemicals called brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been added to a host of consumer and household products, ranging from electronics and mattresses to upholstery and carpets. While they were intended ...

Breakthrough in blue quantum dot technology

There are many things quantum dots could do, but the most obvious place they could change our lives is to make the colors on our TVs and screens more pristine. Research using the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University ...

Analyzing poppies to make better drugs

A team of researchers from the University of Calgary has uncovered new information about a class of plant enzymes that could have implications for the pharmaceutical industry.

A new generation of anti-malarial drugs

Malaria is endemic to large areas of Africa, Asia and South America and annually kills more than 400,000 people, a majority of whom are children under age 5, with hundreds of millions of new infections every year.

Analyzing the world's oldest woody plant fossil

Mapping the evolution of life on Earth requires a detailed understanding of the fossil record, and scientists are using synchrotron-based technologies to look back—way, way back—at the cell structure and chemistry of ...

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