The Canadian Light Source (CLS) is a third-generation 2.9 GeV synchrotron located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. It opened on October 22, 2004 after three years of construction and cost C$173.5 million. One of forty-two such facilities in the world, it occupies a footprint the size of a football field on the grounds of the University of Saskatchewan. The CLS, which is the only synchrotron in Canada, is operated by CLS Inc. a not-for-profit corporation owned by the University of Saskatchewan.

Address
Saskatoon, Canada, Canada
Website
http://www.lightsource.ca/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Light_Source

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Improving engine performance and fuel efficiency

A study conducted in part at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan suggests reformulating lubricating oils for internal combustion engines could significantly improve not only the life of the oil ...

Keeping nuclear power safe

Nuclear energy is clean, powerful, affordable, and zero-emission. A new study uses the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan to help ensure that waste from nuclear power plants remains safe and secure ...

Scientists discover that charcoal traps ammonia pollution

Cornell University scientists Rachel Hestrin and Johannes Lehmann, along with collaborators from Canada and Australia, have shown that charcoal can mop up large quantities of nitrogen from the air pollutant ammonia, resulting ...

Research shows how to improve the bond between implants and bone

Research carried out recently at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) in Saskatoon has revealed promising information about how to build a better dental implant, one that integrates more readily with bone to reduce the risk of ...

Researchers unlock how seaweed is digested

Cattle on the Prairies are hundreds of kilometres from the coast and yet it's possible that seaweed could make its way into their diet as an additive.

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