Moths survive bat predation through acoustic camouflage fur

Moths are a mainstay food source for bats, which use echolocation (biological sonar) to hunt their prey. Scientists such as Thomas Neil, from the University of Bristol in the U.K., are studying how moths have evolved passive ...

Identifying a piranha by its bark

A piranha's bite is definitely worse than its bark, but the bark has uses too. A new study of the sounds made by piranhas in the Amazon finds that their underwater "barks" are an effective tool for identifying different species ...

Deconstructing crowd noise at college basketball games

With thousands of fans clapping, chanting, shouting and jeering, college basketball games can be almost deafeningly loud. Some arenas have decibel meters, which, accurately or not, provide some indication of the noise volume ...

Cloaking devices—it's not just 'Star Trek' anymore

Cloaking devices play a pivotal role in many sci-fi television programs. Scientists are now working to take this technology from the dramatic realm of science fiction and make it real. Amanda D. Hanford, at Pennsylvania State ...

Decoding tornadoes' infrasound waves

Infrasound waves oscillate at frequencies humans can't hear, but they're extremely useful for monitoring nuclear blasts because infrasound decays so slowly within our atmosphere that it can wrap around Earth multiple times. ...

What does a 'normal' voice sound like?

Have you ever turned the dial on the radio or switched the television channel because you found the quality of the presenter's voice grating? What is it about a person's voice that can be soothing, aggravating or even sensual? ...

page 2 from 6