Aarhus University (Danish: Aarhus Universitet) (abbr.: AU), located in the city of Aarhus, Denmark, is Denmark's second oldest and largest university. The university was founded in 1928 and has 43,600 students. Denmark's first professor of sociology was a member of the faculty of Aarhus University (Theodor Geiger, from 1938–1952), and in 1997 Professor Jens Christian Skou received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery of the sodium-potassium pump. In 2010 Dale T. Mortensen, a Niels Bohr Visiting Professor at Aarhus University, received the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences together with his colleagues Peter Diamond and Christopher Pissarides. Aarhus University was founded on September 11, 1928 as Universitetsundervisningen i Jylland ('University Teaching in Jutland') with an enrollment of 64 students. Classrooms were rented from the Technical College and the teaching corps consisted of one professor of philosophy and four associate professors of Danish, English, German, and French. Until then the University of Copenhagen was the only university in Denmark.

Address
Nordre Ringgade 1, Aarhus, Aarhus Municipality, Denmark
Website
http://www.au.dk/en
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aarhus_University

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Solar variability weakens the Walker cell

An international team of researchers from United Kingdom, Denmark, and Germany has found robust evidence for signatures of the 11-year sunspot cycle in the tropical Pacific. They analyzed historical time series of pressure, ...

Strontium isotope maps are disturbed by agricultural lime

Strontium isotopes are frequently used in archaeological studies to establish the provenance and migration history of prehistoric people and artifacts. Many of these studies may be based on incorrect data. A Danish study ...

Researchers find the immune system's unknown messenger

Researchers can now explain how a cell that is being attacked by bacteria or viruses specifically manages to 'sound the alarm' among its neighbouring cells so they can react with a quick response.

DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors

Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. This newly developed eDNA method holds a vast potential for documenting unknown insect-plant interactions, ...

New insight into unique sugar transport in plants

Sugar transport through sugar transport proteins (STP) is unique to plants, and is important for the proper development of plant organs such as pollen. STPs are also used to concentrate sugars in specific tissues like fruit, ...

Human mutation rate has slowed recently

Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and Copenhagen Zoo have discovered that the human mutation rate is significantly slower than for our closest primate relatives. This new knowledge may be important for estimates ...

Satellite images reveal global poverty

How far have nations come in achieving the U.N.'s sustainable development goals? It can be difficult to make a global assessment of poverty and poor economic conditions, but with an eye in the sky, researchers are able to ...

Researchers locate the body's largest cell receptor

A giant toadstool that swallows up vitamins and nutrients in the intestines and kidneys: This is how one receptor that absorbs B12 vitamins in the small intestine looks. For the first time, researchers from Aarhus University, ...

European wheat lacks climate resilience

The climate is not only warming, it is also becoming more variable and extreme. Such unpredictable weather can weaken global food security if major crops such as wheat are not sufficiently resilient—and if we are not properly ...

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