New U.S. chemical screening center to open

September 19, 2007

A new U.S. chemical screening center designed to perform up to 30,000 experiments a day is to open Friday at the University of California-Santa Cruz.

Scientists will use six robots and a library of 55,000 compounds to test chemical for usefulness in fighting disease or understanding fundamental aspects of a cell's life, officials said.

The screening center will be used by university faculty from its departments of chemistry and biochemistry; molecular, cell, and developmental biology; and environmental toxicology.

The $500,000 facility was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of State and the California Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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