South China tigers may be extinct

November 20, 2006

Scientists fear the South China Tiger, one of the world's most endangered species, may be extinct in the wild.

If that is true, the only remaining members of the species are the 68 now living in 18 Chinese zoos, Xinhua, the official government new agency, said. Those tigers are all descended from two males and four females captured in either the 1950s or 1970s and provide too little genetic diversity to preserve the species.

"If we can't find any wild south China tigers, they will certainly disappear because of the inbreeding," said Huang Zihong, a zoologist.

Scientists from the South China Institute of Endangered Species began a search for wild tigers in October, but so far have had little success.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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kkmagician
not rated yet Aug 06, 2008
This is something people need to be aware of! These tigers are crticaly ENDANGERED! As far as I knew, they were extinct! Then I looked at this artical and was so relived. BUT also aware of the problems with these tigers. If we cared more than the average 20 people in the world, I bet all of the people in Indiana could do a search party for these tigers. Go to South China! COME ON! This is an actual problem to be aware of. I want to help these tigers, but I need more than 1 person to do it.
kkmagician
not rated yet Aug 06, 2008
This is something people need to be aware of! These tigers are crticaly ENDANGERED! As far as I knew, they were extinct! Then I looked at this artical and was so relived. BUT also aware of the problems with these tigers. If we cared more than the average 20 people in the world, I bet all of the people in Indiana could do a search party for these tigers. Go to South China! COME ON! This is an actual problem to be aware of. I want to help these tigers, but I need more than 1 person to do it.

And thats the TRUTH. If you want to help with this crisis, please comment this page back, Thank you for the concern of these beautiful tigers. They TRULY are beautiful!

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