Drinking can trigger high death rate

A UCLA study has determined older men who have as few as two drinks weekly and who have diseases that are worsened by alcohol have a high death rate.

Examining data from a 1971-74 health survey and a follow-up survey in 1992, researchers found older men who drank moderately or heavily and had accompanying comorbidities that could be worsened by alcohol use, such as gout or ulcers, or who took medications that might negatively interact with alcohol use had 20-percent higher mortality rates than other drinkers.

The study's lead author, Dr. Alison Moore, associate professor of geriatrics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, said the longitudinal study is the first to examine in a large population the mortality risks inherent in alcohol use and comorbidity.

The research is to be published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International


Explore further

Low muscle mass in arms and legs can heighten mortality risk after 65

Citation: Drinking can trigger high death rate (2006, April 10) retrieved 15 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-04-trigger-high-death.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more