Briefs: Diamond I acquires voice-print technology

March 30, 2006

Diamond I plans to field-test WiFi Casino once it secures the cooperation of one of Vegas' sprawling hotel-casinos.

The technology will be added to the digital finger-print applications that Diamond I is developing for wireless devices that will be used at casinos to allow patrons to try their luck anywhere on the casino premises.

Details of the transaction were not release; however, Diamond I CEO David Loflin Thursday called it a "dynamic biometric technology."

"We believe that, by adding this voice-print security feature to our WifiCasino GS system, we will be in a strong position to assure regulators that our wireless, hand-held gaming system will be used only by authorized casino patrons."

Nevada has passed a new law allowing the use of mobile communications devices on casino floors.

Diamond I plans to field-test WiFi Casino once it secures the cooperation of one of Vegas' sprawling hotel-casinos and said it had preliminary inquiries about the devices from cruise lines and race tracks.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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