Pilots may get help in avoiding turbulence

February 15, 2006

A University of Alabama-Huntsville study of data from weather satellites may soon help pilots avoid turbulence caused by convective thunderstorms.

Working with colleagues at the University of Wisconsin and NASA's Langley Research Center, John Mecikalski, an assistant professor of atmospheric science, has developed a system that's about 65 percent accurate in providing a one-hour warning before heavy rain starts to fall within a thunderstorm.

"Our goal is to take existing, real-time satellite instruments and predict aviation hazards due to thunderstorms and severe weather," said Mecikalski. "(The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) is evaluating our tool, the (Federal Aviation Administration) is testing it and the Huntsville National Weather Service office used it this past summer."

Results of the research were published in the January edition of the journal "Monthly Weather Review" and will be presented during the annual winter meeting of the American Meteorological Society in Atlanta.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Drones could soon get crucial medical supplies to patients in need

Related Stories

GOES-R heads to orbit, will improve weather forecasting

December 6, 2016

GOES-R, the first of NOAA's highly advanced geostationary weather satellites, lifted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 6:42 p.m. EST today. The satellite will boost the nation's weather observation network and NOAA's prediction ...

Six reasons why NOAA's GOES-R satellite matters

November 17, 2016

NOAA's GOES-R weather satellite will soon be launched into space— becoming our nation's most advanced geostationary satellite to date. So what does that mean for you? Here are six reasons to be excited about GOES-R!

Trump meeting puts NASA funding in question

December 8, 2016

Since the election of Donald Trump, NASA has had its share of concerns about the future. Given the President-elect's position and past statements on climate science, there has been speculation that his presidency will curtail ...

Recommended for you

Graphene photodetector enhanced by fractal golden 'snowflake'

January 16, 2017

(Phys.org)—Researchers have found that a snowflake-like fractal design, in which the same pattern repeats at smaller and smaller scales, can increase graphene's inherently low optical absorption. The results lead to graphene ...

Theory lends transparency to how glass breaks

January 16, 2017

Over time, when a metallic glass is put under stress, its atoms will shift, slide and ultimately form bands that leave the material more prone to breaking. Rice University scientists have developed new computational methods ...

A novel way to put flame retardant in a lithium ion battery

January 16, 2017

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Stanford University has found a novel way to introduce flame retardant into a lithium ion battery to prevent fires from occurring. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, ...

How China is poised for marine fisheries reform

January 16, 2017

As global fish stocks continue sinking to alarmingly low levels, a joint study by marine fisheries experts from within and outside of China concluded that the country's most recent fisheries conservation plan can achieve ...

New tools will drive greater understanding of wheat genes

January 16, 2017

Howard Hughes Medical Institute scientists have developed a much-needed genetic resource that will greatly accelerate the study of gene functions in wheat. The resource, a collection of wheat seeds with more than 10 million ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.