U.S. greenhouse emissions up 1.7 percent

February 28, 2006

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says greenhouse gas emissions increased by 1.7 percent during 2004 from the previous year.

The increase, officials said was due primarily to an increase in carbon dioxide emissions associated with fuel and electricity consumption.

The EPA's report, "Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2004," will be open for public comment for 30 days.

The EPA said total emissions of the six main greenhouse gases during 2004 were equivalent to 7,075 million metric tons of carbon dioxide and included carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride.

Fossil fuel combustion was the largest source of emissions, accounting for 80 percent of the total. Overall, greenhouse gas emissions grew 15.8 percent from 1990 to 2004.

After responding to public comments, the United States will submit the final inventory report to the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: How to get more electric vehicles on the road

Related Stories

How to get more electric vehicles on the road

December 13, 2017

Despite the hype and excitement, not to mention the fanciful visions put forth by Tesla's Elon Musk, electric vehicles (EVs) are not yet winning over the transportation sector.

Risks of manipulating the global thermostat

December 12, 2017

If someone offered you a magic pill that claimed to cure all health ailments, would you take it? Let's say you did. Perhaps you'd start eating pizza and ice cream for every meal, since proper nutrition would no longer be ...

How hospitals can go green

December 8, 2017

(HealthDay)—Hospital operating rooms produce thousands of tons of greenhouse gases each year, but changing the type of anesthesia used in surgery can help lower those emissions, researchers report.

Recommended for you

East Antarctic Ice Sheet has history of instability

December 13, 2017

The East Antarctic Ice Sheet locks away enough water to raise sea level an estimated 53 meters (174 feet), more than any other ice sheet on the planet. It's also thought to be among the most stable, not gaining or losing ...

Hydraulic fracturing negatively impacts infant health

December 13, 2017

From North Dakota to Ohio to Pennsylvania, hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, has transformed small towns into energy powerhouses. While some see the new energy boom as benefiting the local economy and decreasing ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.