South Korean cloning expert: I was set up

January 16, 2006

South Korean researcher Hwang Woo-suk, who has admitted falsifying published stem cell and cloning research, reportedly says he was betrayed by colleagues.

South Korean prosecutors are questioning researchers who worked with Hwang to determine whether the researcher and any of his colleagues should face criminal charges, the BBC reported Monday.

Hwang and his associates received millions of dollars in government and private funding, so they conceivably could face fraud and embezzlement charges, the BBC said.

Hwang has apologized for the fabrications.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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