British debate use of nuclear power

A disagreement has arisen among British scientists concerning the use of additional nuclear power plants to combat global warming.

Kevin Anderson, a senior research fellow at the Tyndall Center for Climate Change Research, says claims that nuclear power is the only way for Britain to meet demanding greenhouse gas reduction targets are fundamentally wrong, The Guardian reported Tuesday. "That argument is way too simplistic," he said. "We can easily deal with climate change without nuclear power."

His statement followed contradictory positions by renowned scientist James Lovelock and David King, the British government's chief scientific adviser. They maintain a new generation of nuclear power stations is the only realistic way for Britain to meet energy demand, while reducing carbon dioxide pollution.

Existing nuclear power stations now generate about 20 percent of the United Kingdom's electricity and all but one are scheduled to close by 2023, The Guardian said.

Lovelock and King have urged construction of more nuclear power plants since they do not produce the greenhouse gases associated with conventional power stations.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Citation: British debate use of nuclear power (2006, January 17) retrieved 23 July 2024 from https://phys.org/news/2006-01-british-debate-nuclear-power.html
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