Study: Information order shapes bias

January 30, 2006

Duke University scientists say they've determined consumers are likely to give support to a brand that first appears to show superiority in its category.

The researchers say they looked at a previously unexplored market phenomenon: the powerful influence of "leader-driven primacy" on consumer choice.

"Our research shows how information order can be used to create a tentative preference for one option over another," explain the researchers. "Once a leader emerges, consumers build support for it by biasing their interpretation of new information to favor it. The consequence of this process is that it is possible to dictate which brand consumers ultimately select, merely by changing the order of the information."

The team examined leader-driven primacy using backpacks, winter coats and restaurants. In one study, two options were intentionally made to be equivalent overall. In another, one choice was markedly superior. In both studies, the researchers were able to influence which brand was favored, noting "this is the first paper to show that information order can be used to influence choice in such a way."

The research will appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Consumer Research.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Cambridge Analytica: We designed Trump campaign strategy

Related Stories

Cambridge Analytica: We designed Trump campaign strategy

March 20, 2018

The chief executive of data mining firm Cambridge Analytica told a reporter posing as a potential client that his company played a big role in getting Donald Trump elected, a British news program revealed Tuesday.

Use of HIV-prevention drug grows, but lags among nonwhites

March 20, 2018

Eric Russell, 24, recently joined a health support group for young Latino and black gay men, where he learned about the HIV-prevention pill known as PrEP. He resisted the medication at first, convinced he didn't need it and ...

Expert discusses memory management

March 19, 2018

It took you half an hour to find your keys this morning. You forgot the name of a longtime colleague at a meeting yesterday. You got lost driving to a friend's house last week—it's true that you were more focused on NPR ...

Off-the-shelf smart devices found easy to hack

March 13, 2018

Off-the-shelf devices that include baby monitors, home security cameras, doorbells, and thermostats were easily co-opted by cyber researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU). As part of their ongoing research ...

The early bird got to fly: Archaeopteryx was an active flyer

March 13, 2018

The question of whether the Late Jurassic dino-bird Archaeopteryx was an elaborately feathered ground dweller, a glider, or an active flyer has fascinated palaeontologists for decades. Valuable new information obtained with ...

Recommended for you

Brewing hoppy beer without the hops

March 20, 2018

Hoppy beer is all the rage among craft brewers and beer lovers, and now UC Berkeley biologists have come up with a way to create these unique flavors and aromas without using hops.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.