Nuthatch moves north in Britain

December 24, 2005

The tiny nuthatch, one of the smallest birds in Britain, has been moving north and is now breeding successfully in southern Scotland.

Pete Gordon of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds Scotland said that the birds were first seen north of the border in 1989.

"It is highly likely that this move ties in to climate change, because the northern edge of its range has clearly extended and they are steadily creeping up the country," Gordon told The Scotsman.

Duncan Orr-Ewing, director of land use policy for RSPB Scotland, suggested that milder winters mean more food for the birds, allowing them to breed farther north. He said the proliferation of bird feeders also may have affected the range.

The nuthatch lives in holes in trees that it stops with mud. It feeds on nuts as well as insects it digs out of tree trunks.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Environment, not distance, triggers genetic differences in 'sky island' birds

Related Stories

Warming brings more birds north in winter

April 6, 2009

Long-term global warming is prompting North American birds to winter farther north -- a trend more noticeable in Alaska than anywhere else in the nation, according to a new study by the National Audubon Society.

Recommended for you

AI and 5G in focus at top mobile fair

February 24, 2018

Phone makers will seek to entice new buyers with better cameras and bigger screens at the world's biggest mobile fair starting Monday in Spain after a year of flat smartphone sales.

Archaeologists find ancient necropolis in Egypt

February 24, 2018

Egypt's Antiquities Ministry announced on Saturday the discovery of an ancient necropolis near the Nile Valley city of Minya, south of Cairo, the latest discovery in an area known to house ancient catacombs from the Pharaonic ...

Walking crystals may lead to new field of crystal robotics

February 23, 2018

Researchers have demonstrated that tiny micrometer-sized crystals—just barely visible to the human eye—can "walk" inchworm-style across the slide of a microscope. Other crystals are capable of different modes of locomotion ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.