U.S. lags on cell-phone music listeners

November 3, 2005

Around 19 percent of worldwide cell-phone users listen to music over their phones, although the United States is well behind that pace.

TNS Research said in a new report Thursday that 4 percent of U.S. subscribers regularly listen to music files on their phones, a level that analysts concluded could increase once more phones capable of downloading music become available.

"However," TNS said in a news release, "a recent separate TNS study in the United States among 1,976 wireless users indicated that only 10 percent were either extremely or highly likely to purchase a wireless phone with an integrated iPod or MP3 player."

TNS said that consumer reluctance could soften as Americans become more familiar with the ins and outs of music downloads on telephone devices.

The survey found that phone music is most common in South Korea (26 percent) and Hong Kong (24 percent), and a significant number of users listen to their tunes at home as well as on public transit and while waiting for appointments.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Opinion: The use of sonic 'anti-loitering' devices is breaching teenagers' human rights

Related Stories

New audio codec enables unprecedented voice call quality

May 30, 2017

Smartphones can do almost everything you want, but their poor voice quality is still a vexing issue. Fraunhofer researchers have helped develop a new codec to banish this problem. Their solution raises voice quality to an ...

Recommended for you

What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' reveals

August 23, 2017

The world's shortest race by distance—a fraction of the width of a human hair—was run on gold and silver tracks, and took a whopping 30 hours. Given that the vehicles were invisible to the naked eye, your typical racing ...

Mayweather will beat McGregor, neuroscience predicts

August 23, 2017

In Las Vegas, on August 26, the unbeaten American boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr and the immensely popular Irishman Conor McGregor will face off in a boxing ring, where only striking with hands while standing is allowed. It would ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.