Pantech to launch phone in Japan

October 12, 2005

Pantech said Wednesday it will introduce its latest handset in Japan through a partnership with KDDI.

The South Korean mobile-phone manufacturer will be selling its A1405PT phone under Japanese carrier KDDI's brand name, au. It will be au's smallest handset on the market.

"We have ambitious plans to grow our operations in Japan, which is one of the world's most developed mobile phone markets," Moon Song, president of Pantech, said in a news release.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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