Sun still unsettled for another few days

September 13, 2005

Geomagnetic storms are expected to continue for the next few days, raising the chances of disruptions to radio transmissions and other communications.

Flares and other solar activity spiked last week and continued through Monday night with four big M-class eruptions reported in one region of the Sun's surface.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted Tuesday that solar activity would continue until around Sept. 15 with geomagnetic storms reaching G2 level, solar radiation storms at S1, and radio blackouts reaching R2 over the next 24 hours.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: NASA detects solar flare pulses at Sun and Earth

Related Stories

NASA detects solar flare pulses at Sun and Earth

November 16, 2017

When our Sun erupts with giant explosions—such as bursts of radiation called solar flares—we know they can affect space throughout the solar system as well as near Earth. But monitoring their effects requires having observatories ...

Air pollution cuts solar energy potential in China

October 23, 2017

China is rapidly expanding its solar power supply, hoping to meet 10 percent of the nation's electricity needs with solar energy by 2030. But there's a problem: severe air pollution is blocking light from the sun, significantly ...

Saturn's radiation belts: A stranger to the solar wind

October 30, 2017

The radiation belts of Earth and Saturn differ more strongly than previously assumed. In these belts, very energetic particles, such as electrons and protons, move around the planet at high velocities - captured by its magnetic ...

Atmospheric beacons guide NASA scientists in search for life

November 2, 2017

Some exoplanets shine brighter than others in the search for life beyond the solar system. New NASA research proposes a novel approach to sniffing out exoplanet atmospheres. It takes advantage of frequent stellar storms—which ...

Recommended for you

Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war

November 17, 2017

Nature whispers its stories in a faint molecular language, and Rice University scientist Laurence Yeung and colleagues can finally tell one of those stories this week, thanks to a one-of-a-kind instrument that allowed them ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.