Microsoft supports India IT education

September 22, 2005

Microsoft is joining a new push in India to expand Internet access and close the digital divide on the sub-continent.

India's communications minister, Shri Dayanidhi Maran, met with Bill Gates at Microsoft's U.S. headquarters this week to discuss plans to streamline Indian broadband access and accelerate IT literacy.

Among the specifics is the launch of a new multi-lingual version of Windows XP's starter program for the Indian market, and Microsoft's "adoption" of 100 Indian schools for interactive IT education.

"The various steps announced today address important issues like IT literacy, taking high-quality IT education to schools in India, availability of local language computing solutions and e-governance," Shri Maran said in a statement. "There is an urgent need to enable affordable access to locally relevant IT applications at a broad level."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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