Greenhouse gas to be stored under sea

June 14, 2005

LONDON, June 14 (UPI) -- The British government announced plans Tuesday to tackle climate change by storing greenhouse gases under the North Sea.
Carbon dioxide will be captured from power plants and stored in depleted North Sea oil and gas fields, in an effort to reduce Britain's emissions.

Energy Minister Malcolm Wicks said carbon capture and storage would be possible by 2015. The government set aside $45 million for the plan.

New efforts to improve the efficiency of existing power plants and develop hydrogen and fuel cell technologies were also announced.The plans total about $72 million.

Wicks said that reaching the British target of cutting carbon emissions by 60 percent by 2050 meant developing technologies for burning coal and gas more cleanly.

While the government had to maintain the push toward renewables and energy efficiency, cleaning up the use of fossil fuels and developing the potential of hydrogen and fuel cells was "a vital long-term objective," he said.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

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Arkaleus
not rated yet Aug 18, 2009
This is top-grade buffoonery. Next we'll hear about the great advances in liberating sunbeams from cucumbers. I'm sure there's some renewable energy sources we've overlooked like reclaimed flatulence. We might be able to bubble over the peat bogs and reclaim the methane they emit. What a wonderous age!

An anemic and impoverished Britain by 2050, with her industries dwindled down to nothing but polically-correct carbon-capped showpieces. Good luck in your brave new society.

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