Trends is a series of scientific journals owned by Elsevier that publish review articles in a range of areas of biology. They are currently part of Elsevier s Cell Press group of journals. The Trends series was founded in 1976 with Trends in Biochemical Sciences (TIBS), rapidly followed by Trends in Neurosciences (TINS), Trends in Pharmacological Sciences (TIPS) and Immunology Today. Swift expansion of the formula during the 1980s and 1990s included non-biological titles, Trends in Food Science and Technology and Trends in Polymer Science, which were later discontinued or removed from the series. Immunology Today, Parasitology Today and Molecular Medicine Today changed their names to Trends in... in 2001. Drug Discovery Today was spun off as an independent brand. Originally published in Cambridge, UK, the Trends Editorial Office moved to London during the mid-1990s, after Elsevier acquired Pergamon Press. As of 2010, they are published under the Cell Press imprint from an editorial office in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. The current set of Trends journals are all published monthly:

Publisher
Cell Press
History
1976–present
Website
http://www.cell.com/cellpress/trends

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Can animals use iridescent colors to communicate?

A new paper from the University of Melbourne reveals how animals use beautiful but unreliable iridescent colors as communication signals. Special adaptations enable animals to control how these shifting colors appear so that ...

High social and ecological standards for chocolate

Worldwide demand for food from the tropics that meets higher environmental and social standards has risen sharply in recent years. Consumers often have to make ethically questionable decisions: products may be available to ...

Following in the footsteps of elephants

Imagine for a moment that you're 6,000 pounds, living in one of the wildest places on Earth, with no schedule, nowhere to be. How do you decide where to spend your time? Where to go next? Do you move where food is most plentiful? ...

Native guava first Australian casualty of global plant disease

The native guava is one of the first Australian plants to be pushed to the brink of extinction by a fungal plant disease which has spread rapidly across the globe, according to a new study by scientists from the Australian ...

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