Trends is a series of scientific journals owned by Elsevier that publish review articles in a range of areas of biology. They are currently part of Elsevier s Cell Press group of journals. The Trends series was founded in 1976 with Trends in Biochemical Sciences (TIBS), rapidly followed by Trends in Neurosciences (TINS), Trends in Pharmacological Sciences (TIPS) and Immunology Today. Swift expansion of the formula during the 1980s and 1990s included non-biological titles, Trends in Food Science and Technology and Trends in Polymer Science, which were later discontinued or removed from the series. Immunology Today, Parasitology Today and Molecular Medicine Today changed their names to Trends in... in 2001. Drug Discovery Today was spun off as an independent brand. Originally published in Cambridge, UK, the Trends Editorial Office moved to London during the mid-1990s, after Elsevier acquired Pergamon Press. As of 2010, they are published under the Cell Press imprint from an editorial office in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. The current set of Trends journals are all published monthly:

Publisher
Cell Press
History
1976–present
Website
http://www.cell.com/cellpress/trends

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Scientists alarmed by bark beetle boom

Bark beetles are currently responsible for killing an unprecedented number of trees in forests across Europe and North America. Why the beetle populations first explode to decline naturally after a few years is largely unknown. ...

Conservation goals compete at the expense of biodiversity

With an ever-growing list of threats facing biodiversity on multiple scales, conservationists struggle to determine which to address. A common reaction is to prioritize their efforts on threats to individual species or management ...

How species improve their success

Researchers Pim Edelaar at Pablo de Olavide University (Seville, Spain) and Daniel Bolnick at the University of Connecticut (U.S.) have developed a classification of the ways that species can improve their success in relation ...

On the horizon: Looking ahead for global conservation

Every year for the last decade, an expert team of horizon scanners, science communicators and researchers have identified the top emerging issues in global conservation. This year's team included Fauna & Flora International's ...

page 1 from 6