Proceedings of the Royal Society A

Proceedings A publishes articles across the chemical, computational, Earth, engineering, mathematical, and physical sciences. The journal publishes research papers, as well as short reviews containing original and interesting new ideas. The articles published are high-quality, original, fundamental articles of interest to a wide range of scientists, and often have long citation half-lives. As well as established disciplines, we encourage emerging and interdisciplinary areas.

Publisher
The Royal Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
1905-present
Impact factor
5.064 (2010)
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How to cut your lawn for grasshoppers

Picture a grasshopper landing randomly on a lawn of fixed area. If it then jumps a certain distance in a random direction, what shape should the lawn be to maximise the chance that the grasshopper stays on the lawn after ...

dateNov 22, 2017 in Mathematics
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How close to invisible can a mirror be?

(Phys.org)—In 2011, mathematicians Alexander Plakhov and Vera Roshchina proved that objects with mirror surfaces cannot be perfectly invisible. Now in a new study, Plakhov has returned to the problem, asking just how close ...

dateOct 06, 2017 in Mathematics feature
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Two-ball bounce problem explained

Researchers from the University of Bristol have revisited a well-known classroom demonstration where a lighter ball is dropped on top of a larger heavier ball and offer a model to explain the phenomenon.

dateJul 14, 2015 in General Physics
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The mathematics of golf

(Phys.org)—The official Rules of Golf, which are continually being revised and updated as new equipment emerges, have close ties to mathematics. In many cases, math is used to place limitations on golf equipment, such as ...

dateAug 16, 2017 in Mathematics feature
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Why too much evidence can be a bad thing

(Phys.org)—Under ancient Jewish law, if a suspect on trial was unanimously found guilty by all judges, then the suspect was acquitted. This reasoning sounds counterintuitive, but the legislators of the time had noticed ...

dateJan 04, 2016 in Mathematics report
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