Physical Review (abbreviated as Phys. Rev.) is an American scientific journal founded in 1893 by Edward Nichols. It publishes original research and scientific and literature reviews on all aspects of physics. It is published by the American Physical Society. The journal is in its third series, and is split in several sub-journals each covering a particular field of physics. It has a sister journal, Physical Review Letters which publishes shorter articles of broader interest. All of the journals of the APS are recognized internationally as among the best and well known in physics. Many of the most famous physics papers published in the 20th century have appeared in the pages of the Physical Review family of journals. Physical Review commenced publication in July 1893, organized by Cornell University professor Edward Nichols and helped by the new President of Cornell, J. Gould Schurman. The journal was managed and edited at Cornell in upstate New York from 1893 to 1913 by Nichols, Ernest Merritt, and Frederick Bedell. The 33 volumes published during this time constitute Physical Review Series I. The American Physical Society (APS), founded in 1899, took over its publication in 1913

Publisher
American Physical Society
Country
United States
History
1893–1913 Series I
1913–1970 Series II
*1970–present Phys. Rev. A , B , C , D *1993–present Phys. Rev. E *1998–present Phys. Rev. Focus *1998–present Phys. Rev. ST AB *2005–present Phys. Rev. ST PER *2008–present Physics
Website
http://publish.aps.org/

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A fresh look at metals reveals a 'strange' similarity

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