Epigenetic repression suppresses genomic instability

Susan Gasser and her group at the FMI have found the pathway through which eukaryotic organisms protect their genomes from rearrangements and deletions that arise from repetitive DNA. Human genomes, like those of simple animals ...

Changes in the immune system lead to success

The sequencing of the Atlantic cod genome in 2011 demonstrated that this species lacks a crucial part of its immune system. In a follow-up study, Kjetill S. Jakobsen and collaborators have investigated a large number of additional ...

How Chinese cabbage and white cabbage became alike

White cabbage and Chinese cabbage have a lot in common: both have leaves that wrap tightly around each other to form a leafy head. Remarkably, however, these two crops originate from two different Brassica species used and ...

Genome of 6,000-year-old barley grains sequenced for first time

An international team of researchers has succeeded for the first time in sequencing the genome of Chalcolithic barley grains. This is the oldest plant genome to be reconstructed to date. The 6,000-year-old seeds were retrieved ...

Four newly-identified genes could improve rice

A Japanese research team have applied a method used in human genetic analysis to rice and rapidly discovered four new genes that are potentially significant for agriculture. These findings could influence crop breeding and ...

Now we know why carrots are orange

Scientists unveiled Monday the gene in carrots that gives rise to carotenoids, a critical source of Vitamin A and the pigment that turns some fruits and vegetables bright orange or red.

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