Nano Letters is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Chemical Society. It was established in January 2001. The two editors-in-chief are A. Paul Alivisatos (University of California, Berkeley) and Charles M. Lieber (Harvard University). The 2010 impact factor for Nano Letters is 12.219, according to the Journal Citation Reports. The focus of the journal is rapid dissemination of selected elements regarding fundamental, original research reports on all topics related to the theory and practice of nanoscience and nanotechnology and their subdisciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological phenomena related to nanoscience and nanotechnology are part of this focus. Furthermore nanoscale materials science is also included, focusing on processes and applications of structures at this size. Subject coverage encompasses the following: Materials that are synthesized and processed by physical, chemical, and biological methods. The classes of these materials are organic, inorganic, and hybrid. Furthermore, these processes are subjects of modeling and simulation. Specifically these process range from synthesis to assembly, along with relevant interactions.

Publisher
American Chemical Society
Country
United States
History
2001--present
Website
http://pubs.acs.org/journal/nalefd
Impact factor
12.219 (2010)

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Improved 3-D nanoprinting technique to build nanoskyscrapers

Nanowalls, nanobridges, nano "jungle gyms": It could seem like the description of a Lilliputian village, but these are actual 3-D-printed components with potential applications in nanoelectronics, smart materials and biomedical ...

A new tool tidies up molecules at the nano level

Tidying up. Not an idea associated with living cells on the nanoscale. But just as a mismash of IKEA bits scattered throughout your bedroom is less useful than a neatly-assembled dresser, synthetic biologists wish to have ...

A more efficient way to turn saltwater into drinking water

Water scarcity is a major problem across the world. "It affects every continent," says Amir Barati Farimani, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. "Four billion people live under ...

Artificial cells act more like the real thing

Protocells—artificial cells—that are active and mimic living cells by moving independently and that are biocompatible and enzymatically active are now possible using an improved method developed by Penn State researchers.

Electron correlations in carbon nanostructures

New materials are needed to further reduce the size of electronic components and thus make devices such as laptops and smartphones faster and more efficient. Tiny nanostructures of the novel material graphene are promising ...

Grain boundaries in graphene do not affect spin transport

Researchers from the ICN2 Theoretical and Computational Nanoscience Group as well as the Université catholique de Louvain have used numerical simulations to show that spin diffusion length is independent of grain size. The ...

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