Molecular Ecology is a twice monthly scientific journal covering investigations that use molecular genetic techniques to address questions in ecology, evolution, behavior, and conservation. Molecular Ecology is published by Wiley-Blackwell. Harry Smith is the founding editor in chief, while Loren Rieseberg is the current one. Its 2010 impact factor is 6.457.

Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
History
1992–present
Website
http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1083
Impact factor
6.457 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Supergene discovery leads to new knowledge of fire ants

A unique study conducted by University of Georgia entomologists led to the discovery of a distinctive supergene in fire ant colonies that determines whether young queen ants will leave their birth colony to start their own ...

Lost frogs rediscovered with environmental DNA

Scientists have detected signs of a frog listed extinct and not seen since 1968, using an innovative technique to locate declining and missing species in two regions of Brazil.

Researchers track origin of one of nature's biggest killers

A mosquito species that is one of the world's leading killers of humans arose more than 7 million years ago on islands in the Indian Ocean, some of which had no mammals of any kind, according to a genetic analysis by Yale ...

Research breakthrough in fight against chytrid fungus

For frogs dying of the invasive chytridiomycosis disease, the leading cause of amphibian deaths worldwide, the genes responsible for protecting them may actually be leading to their demise, according to a new study published ...

Using DNA in the water tell us how many fish are there

River water, lake water, and seawater contain DNA belonging to organisms such as animals and plants. Ecologists have begun to actively analyze such DNA molecules, called environmental DNA, to assess the distribution of macro-organisms. ...

Size matters in the sex life of salmon

For Atlantic salmon, size matters when it comes to love. Larger males and females that may spend up to four years at sea produce many more babies, but they are very rare compared to younger fish.

Have resistance, will travel

Around the world, pest insects like mosquitoes often become resistant to the insecticides meant to control them, causing problems for agriculture and public health.

Is Niagara Falls a barrier against fish movement?

New research shows that fishes on either side of Niagara Falls—one of the most powerful waterfalls in the world—are unlikely to breed with one another. Knowing how well the falls serves as a barrier to fish movement is ...

page 1 from 17