Journal of Youth and Adolescence provides a single, high-level medium of communication for psychologists, psychiatrists, biologists, criminologists, educators, and professionals in many other allied disciplines who address the subject of youth and adolescence. The journal publishes papers based on experimental evidence and data, theoretical papers, and comprehensive review articles. The journal especially welcomes empirically rigorous papers that take policy implications seriously. Research need not have been designed to address policy needs, but manuscripts must address implications for the manner society formally (e.g., through laws, policies or regulations) or informally (e.g., through parents, peers, and social institutions) responds to the period of youth and adolescence.

Publisher
Springer Science+Business Media
Website
http://www.springer.com/psychology/child+%26+school+psychology/journal/10964
Impact factor
1.751 (2010)

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Study links parental support and career success of children

A recent study finds that young people who get financial support from their parents have greater professional success, highlighting one way social inequality is transmitted from one generation to the next.

Gender-affirming restrooms recommended for schools

Educational policies and practices should explicitly ensure the wellbeing and healthy development of all students by supporting the right of students to use a bathroom in an institutional context that affirms their gender ...

Does home comfort promote complacency?

Working as a volunteer in crisis regions or in social projects, petitioning, and taking part in political debates and demonstrations - there are a lot of opportunities for civic engagement. "Such activities are important ...

Smartphones change teenagers' digital media use patterns

Teenagers who own smartphones spend more time online - also during the night, which may affect their sleep. A new University of Basel study on more than 300 students reports that teenagers' digital media use during the night ...

Immigrants less likely to commit major crimes, study says

(Phys.org) —The perception that immigrants are linked to crime in the United States is something that has existed for decades or longer. However, UT Dallas criminologist Alex Piquero says, that view is not supported by ...

Age and the decline in crime

(Phys.org) —Probation officers see firsthand the effect age has on crime. Typically, an offender will commit fewer crimes as he or she ages.  

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