The Journal of Neuroscience is a weekly scientific journal published by the Society for Neuroscience. The journal publishes peer-reviewed empirical research articles in the field of neuroscience. Its editor-in-chief is John Maunsell, a Boston-based neuroscientist specializing in the visual cortex. Volume 1 appeared in 1981 and issues appeared monthly; as its popularity grew it switched to a bimonthly in 1996 and then to a weekly in July, 2003. Articles appear within one of the following four sections of the journal: In addition, some issues of the journal contain articles in the following sections:

Publisher
Society for Neuroscience
Country
United States
History
1981--present
Website
http://www.jneurosci.org/
Impact factor
7.271 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Breeding foxes for opposite behaviors produces similar brain changes

Farmed foxes selectively bred for tameness and aggressiveness exhibit similar changes to their brain anatomy, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. Both lineages also have larger brains than conventional ...

Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing

To determine where a sound is coming from, animal brains analyze the minute difference in time it takes a sound to reach each ear—a cue known as interaural time difference. What happens to the cue once the signals get to ...

Fish talk-os: Studying electrocommunication in the wild

A field study published in JNeurosci of tropical fish in Central America reveals how the animals use electric fields to communicate in their natural habitat to accomplish coordinated behaviors including mating and reproduction.

Neuropeptide controls roundworms' backward movement

A study of genetically diverse worms finds that the length of their backward movement is under the control of a small protein called a neuropeptide that fluctuates in response to food availability. The research, published ...

Same gene, different mating techniques in flies

A study of two related species of fruit fly published in JNeurosci reveals that a gene known to regulate behavior for attracting a mate in one species gives rise to unique wooing techniques observed in the other species.

page 1 from 2