The Journal of Mammalogy has been the flagship publication of the American Society of Mammalogists since 1919 and was voted one of the top 100 most influential serials in biology and medicine of the 20th century. This highly respected international scientific journal is produced 6 times per year and promotes interest in mammals throughout the world by the publication of original and timely research on all aspects of the biology of mammals. Timely papers are published on mammalian behavior, conservation, ecology, genetics, morphology, physiology, and taxonomy. Society news and student scholarship opportunities are published regularly at the end of each issue.

Publisher
The American Society of Mammalogists
Website
http://www.mammalsociety.org/journal-mammalogy

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The secret social lives of giant poisonous rats

The African crested rat (Lophiomys imhausi) is hardly the continent's most fearsome-looking creature—the rabbit-sized rodent resembles a gray puffball crossed with a skunk—yet its fur is packed with a poison so lethal ...

American Pikas show resiliency in the face of global warming

The American pika is a charismatic, diminutive relative of rabbits that some researchers say is at high risk of extinction due to climate change. Pikas typically live in cool habitats, often in mountains, under rocks and ...

Understanding a major source of Minnesota moose decline

New research from a multi-disciplinary team shows where a moose spends time in the spring has the strongest connection to whether the moose becomes infected with the parasite known as brain worm.

Genetics reveal Pacific subspecies of fin whale

New genetic research has identified fin whales in the northern Pacific Ocean as a separate subspecies, reflecting a revolution in marine mammal taxonomy as scientists unravel the genetics of enormous animals otherwise too ...

Resting postures determined by animals' size

Cows always rest on their chests so that their digestion is not impaired. Rodents sometimes rest sitting down, while kangaroos sometimes lie on their backs. The larger the animal, the less often it lies down, and when it ...

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