The Journal of Mammalogy has been the flagship publication of the American Society of Mammalogists since 1919 and was voted one of the top 100 most influential serials in biology and medicine of the 20th century. This highly respected international scientific journal is produced 6 times per year and promotes interest in mammals throughout the world by the publication of original and timely research on all aspects of the biology of mammals. Timely papers are published on mammalian behavior, conservation, ecology, genetics, morphology, physiology, and taxonomy. Society news and student scholarship opportunities are published regularly at the end of each issue.

Publisher
The American Society of Mammalogists
Website
http://www.mammalsociety.org/journal-mammalogy

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Resting postures determined by animals' size

Cows always rest on their chests so that their digestion is not impaired. Rodents sometimes rest sitting down, while kangaroos sometimes lie on their backs. The larger the animal, the less often it lies down, and when it ...

Weirdly shaped mouse sperm can be used to tell species apart

Think back to health class and picture a sperm. It's got a smooth rounded head, with a long skinny tail at the end, right? As it turns out, the sperm from different species of animals have different shapes—and, as a new ...

Study bolsters bats' reputation as mosquito devourers

It's a common assumption: Bats are important because they feast upon those pervasive warm-weather pests known as mosquitoes. You want to see bats flying above, cleaning up the night sky and ridding you of itchy bites and ...

New shrew species discovered on 'sky island' in Philippines

The Philippines teems with biodiversity: 657 bird species roam and fly throughout the country's 7,641 islands, and over 2,000 fish species swim in the surrounding seas. But beyond these beaked and scaly creatures, the Philippines ...

There are more mammal species than we thought

A recent study published in the Journal of Mammalogy, at Oxford University Press, highlights that over 1000 new species of mammals have been described globally during the last dozen years, a finding that contradicts the notion ...

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