The Journal of Comparative Psychology publishes original empirical and theoretical research from a comparative perspective on the behavior, cognition, perception, and social relationships of diverse species. The submission of articles containing data on multiple species and multiple tasks is especially encouraged. Studies can be descriptive or experimental and can be conducted in the field or in captivity.

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Website
http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/com/index.aspx
Impact factor
1.725 (2011)

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Ball or stuffed toy—do dogs 'know' what they're smelling?

Dogs' excellent sense of smell is well-known, whether it is in the context of searching for people or for contraband substances. However, the question of how dogs understand what they perceive with their sense of smell has ...

Study reveals fox squirrels' tell-tail signs of frustration

Fox squirrels flick their tails when they can't get a cherished nut in much the same way that humans kick a vending machine that fails to deliver the anticipated soda or candy bar, according to new research from the University ...

Can a bonobo keep the beat?

Humans have a remarkable ability to synchronize to complex, temporally structured acoustic signals, an ability which is believed to underlie social coordination and may be a precursor to speech. This ability takes years to ...

Chimpanzees show ability to plan route in computer mazes

Chimpanzees are capable of some degree of planning for the future, in a manner similar to human children, while some species of monkeys struggle with this task, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Wofford ...

Show us how you play and it may tell us who you are

The ways animals play with inedible objects may be precursors of functional behaviors such as tool use and goal directed object manipulation. For these reasons, species of high technical intelligence are also expected to ...

Scientists study 'talking' turtles in Brazilian Amazon

Turtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.

Cockatoos know what is going on behind barriers

How do you know that the cookies are still there although they have been placed out of your sight into the drawer? How do you know when and where a car that has driven into a tunnel will reappear? The ability to represent ...