Human Nature is dedicated to advancing the interdisciplinary investigation of the biological, social, and environmental factors that underlie human behavior. It focuses primarily on the functional unity in which these factors are continuously and mutually interactive. These include the evolutionary, biological, and sociological processes as they interact with human social behavior; the biological and demographic consequences of human history; the cross-cultural, cross-species, and historical perspectives on human behavior; and the relevance of a biosocial perspective to scientific, social, and policy issues.

Publisher
Springer
Website
http://www.springer.com/social+sciences/anthropology+%26+archaeology/journal/12110
Impact factor
1.955 (2011)

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Bonobos share and share alike

Bonobos are willing to share meat with animals outside their own family groups. This behaviour was observed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and is documented in a new study in Springer's journal Human Nature. Even ...

When does a man say 'I'm the father'?

American men much more readily acknowledge that they are the legal father of a child born out of wedlock when the woman involved is more affluent, educated, and healthy. It also helps (slightly) if the baby is a boy, says ...

When queuing in a supermarket, who do you let go first?

Unlike cooperation among individuals that meet on a regular basis, one-shot interactions among strangers are not motivated by the prospect of receiving a favour in return. So why bother being helpful? In an attempt to shed ...

Chimps are sensitive to what is right and wrong

How a chimpanzee views a video of an infant chimp from another group being killed gives a sense of how human morality and social norms might have evolved. So says Claudia Rudolf von Rohr of the University of Zurich in Switzerland, ...

Laughter is an effective catalyst for new relationships

If you want someone to open up to you, just make them laugh. Sharing a few good giggles and chuckles makes people more willing to tell others something personal about themselves, without even necessarily being aware that ...

Strong institutions reduce in-group favoritism

Ineffective social and political institutions make people more likely to favour their family and own local social group, while good institutions make them more likely to follow impersonal rules that are fair to everyone, ...

Transgendered males seen as an asset to some ancestral societies

Transgendered androphilic males were accepted in traditional hunter-gatherer cultures because they were an extra set of hands to support their families. Conversely, by investing in and supporting their kin, these males ensured ...

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