Since 1964, BioScience has presented readers with timely and authoritative overviews of current research in biology, accompanied by essays and discussion sections on education, public policy, history, and the conceptual underpinnings of the biological sciences. A peer-reviewed, heavily cited, monthly journal with content written and edited for accessibility to researchers, educators, and students alike, BioScience is provided to all AIBS members in print and online as a part of regular AIBS dues. BioScience includes articles about research findings and techniques, advances in biology education, professionally written feature articles about the latest frontiers in biology, discussions of professional issues, book reviews, news about AIBS, a policy column (Washington Watch), and an education column (Eye on Education). Roundtables, forums, and viewpoint articles offer the perspectives of opinion leaders and invite further commentary.

Publisher
AIBS
Website
http://www.aibs.org/bioscience/

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Study investigates why researchers are wary of sharing data

Carleton University's Marie Curie Global Fellow Dominique Roche has co-authored a paper on the barriers researchers face to publicly sharing their data, an issue that has gained prominence during the COVID-19 pandemic. The ...

The future of biodiversity collections

Events such as the COVID-19 pandemic have highlighted the crucial role played by biodiversity collections in enabling rapid responses to crises and in facilitating ongoing research across numerous fields. Despite the recognized ...

Building a culture of high-quality data

The era of big data has inundated nearly all scientific fields with torrents of newly available data with the power to stimulate new research and enable inquiry at scales not previously possible. This is particularly true ...

Invasive species often start as undetected 'sleeper populations'

When an invasive species overruns a new ecosystem, it is often assumed that the invader recently arrived at its new home and rapidly took over. But a new report in the journal BioScience finds that many new arrivals aren't ...

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