Biomacromolecules is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published since 2000 by the American Chemical Society. Biomacromolecules is currently indexed in Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), SCOPUS, EBSCOhost, British Library, PubMed, Ovid, Web of Science, and SwetsWise. As of 2010, the editor in chief is Ann-Christine Albertsson. According to the 2010 Journal Citation Reports, the journal s impact factor is 5.325.

Publisher
American Chemical Society
Country
United States
History
2000–present
Website
http://pubs.acs.org/journal/bomaf6
Impact factor
5.325 (2010)

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Bacteria biochemistry controlled with insoluble material

Trevor Franklin, a doctoral student in Cornell's Robert Frederick Smith School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, was preparing a study about anti-fouling surfaces when he noticed something strange.

Life may have become cellular by using unusual molecules

All modern life is composed of cells, from single-celled bacteria to more complex organisms such as humans, which may contain billions or even trillions of cells. But how life came to be cellular remains uncertain. New research ...

Painting with bacteria could revolutionise wastewater treatment

Improvements to a new type of water-based paint containing bacteria could pave the way for advancements in waste management and the production of biomass or biofuel gasses, a new study in the American Chemical Society journal, ...

Universal virus detection platform to expedite viral diagnosis

The quick, accurate detection of a virus on a wide scale is the key to combating infectious diseases such as COVID-19. A new viral diagnostic strategy using reactive polymer-grafted, double-stranded RNAs will serve as a pre-screening ...

A bioplastic that protects against UV radiation

Researchers at the University of Oulu's Research Unit of Sustainable Chemistry have developed a new synthetic bioplastic that, unlike traditional carbon-based plastics or other bioplastics, provides protection from the sun's ...

Wood-based fiber captures hormones from wastewater

VTT and Aalto University have developed a wood-based cellulose fiber yarn that is an affordable solution for capturing pharmaceutical substances—especially ethinylestradiol in contraceptive pills—that would otherwise ...

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