Astrophysical Journal

The Astrophysical Journal is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering astronomy and astrophysics. It was founded in 1895 by the American astronomers George Ellery Hale and James Edward Keeler. It publishes three 500-page issues per month. Since 1953, The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series has been published in conjunction with The Astrophysical Journal. It aims to supplement the material in the journal. It publishes six volumes per year, with two 280-page issues per volume. The journal and the supplement series were both published by the University of Chicago Press for the American Astronomical Society. In January 2009 publication was transferred to Institute of Physics Publishing, following the move of the society s Astronomical Journal in 2008. The reason for the changes were given by the Society as the increasing financial demands of the Press. The Astrophysical Journal Letters is another section of The Astrophysical Journal intended to publish rapid communications.

Publisher
Institute of Physics Publishing
Country
United States
History
1895–present
Impact factor
6.063 (Journal)
5.158 (Letters)
15.206 (Supplement) (2010)
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Mind the gap—Rapid Burster behaviour explained

Scientists observing a curious neutron star in a binary system known as the 'Rapid Burster' may have solved a forty-year-old mystery surrounding its puzzling X-ray bursts. They discovered that its magnetic field creates a ...

dateFeb 01, 2017 in Astronomy
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Hubble catches a stellar exodus in action

Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have captured for the first time snapshots of fledgling white dwarf stars beginning their slow-paced, 40-million-year migration from the crowded center of an ancient star cluster ...

dateMay 14, 2015 in Astronomy
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NuSTAR finds new clues to 'chameleon supernova'

"We're made of star stuff," astronomer Carl Sagan famously said. Nuclear reactions that happened in ancient stars generated much of the material that makes up our bodies, our planet and our solar system. When stars explode ...

dateJan 25, 2017 in Astronomy
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VLT discovers new kind of globular star cluster

Observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile have discovered a new class of 'dark' globular star clusters around the giant galaxy Centaurus A. These mysterious objects look similar to normal clusters, but contain ...

dateMay 13, 2015 in Astronomy
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