Astrophysical Journal Letters

The Astrophysical Journal is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering astronomy and astrophysics. It was founded in 1895 by the American astronomers George Ellery Hale and James Edward Keeler. It publishes three 500-page issues per month. Since 1953, The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series has been published in conjunction with The Astrophysical Journal. It aims to supplement the material in the journal. It publishes six volumes per year, with two 280-page issues per volume. The journal and the supplement series were both published by the University of Chicago Press for the American Astronomical Society. In January 2009 publication was transferred to Institute of Physics Publishing, following the move of the society s Astronomical Journal in 2008. The reason for the changes were given by the Society as the increasing financial demands of the Press. The Astrophysical Journal Letters is another section of The Astrophysical Journal intended to publish rapid communications.

Publisher
Institute of Physics Publishing
Country
United States
History
1895–present
Impact factor
6.063 (Journal)
5.158 (Letters)
15.206 (Supplement) (2010)
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An exoplanet with an infernal atmosphere

As part of the PlanetS National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR), astronomers from the Universities of Geneva (UNIGE) and Bern, Switzerland, have come to measure the temperature of the atmosphere of an exoplanet with ...

dateApr 13, 2015 in Astronomy
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Exoplanet has smothering stratosphere without water

A NASA-led team has found evidence that the oversized exoplanet WASP-18b is wrapped in a smothering stratosphere loaded with carbon monoxide and devoid of water. The findings come from a new analysis of observations made ...

dateNov 30, 2017 in Astronomy
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'Venus zone' narrows search for habitable planets

Long before the hunt began to find Earth lookalikes around other stars, one planet in the Solar System had already been named Earth's twin. With its similar size and mass, Venus measures very close to Earth, with one major ...

dateApr 14, 2015 in Astronomy
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Giant gas cloud boomeranging back into Milky Way

Since astronomers discovered the Smith Cloud, a giant gas cloud plummeting toward the Milky Way, they have been unable to determine its composition, which would hold clues as to its origin. University of Notre Dame astrophysicist ...

dateJan 28, 2016 in Astronomy
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