Animal Cognition is an interdisciplinary journal offering current research from many disciplines (ethology, behavioral ecology, animal behavior and learning, cognitive sciences, comparative psychology and evolutionary psychology) on all aspects of animal (and human) cognition in an evolutionary framework. Animal Cognition publishes original empirical and theoretical work, reviews, short communications and correspondence on the mechanisms and evolution of biologically rooted cognitive-intellectual structures. The journal explores animal time perception and use; causality detection; innate reaction patterns and innate bases of learning; numerical competence and frequency expectancies; symbol use; communication; problem solving, animal thinking and use of tools, and the modularity of the mind.

Publisher
Springer
Website
http://www.springer.com/life+sciences/behavioural/journal/10071
Impact factor
3.089 (2011)

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'I know this song!' Evolutionary keys to musical perception

How do we perceive music and sounds? This question is the basis of the research by the Language and Comparative Cognition Group (LCC) of the UPF Center for Brain and Cognition (CBC) published recently in the journal Animal ...

Dogs can recognize their owner by voice alone

A new study from the researchers of the Department of Ethology at Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE), Hungary reveals that dogs can recognize their owner by voice alone, and they make use of some of the same voice properties ...

Exploring the strategies of categorization

Colloquially referred to as pigeonholing, categorisation learning often has a rather negative connotation in the public eye. Yet the basic cognitive ability to categorize offers a significant advantage: it condenses the flood ...

Talk-to-tilt: Head tilting in dogs

According to a new study, just published in Animal Cognition, some dogs, those that can learn the name of their toys, tilt their heads upon hearing their owners requesting a toy. The side of the tilt seems to be consistent ...

African grey parrots may have better self-control than macaws

African grey parrots may be better able than macaws to delay gratification—rejecting an immediate reward in favor of a better one in the future—according to a study published in the journal Animal Cognition.

Gorillas can tell human voices apart

Many animals recognize the voices of members of their own species, and some can even recognize those of other species, such as humans. But it turns out a few animals, such as gorillas, can not only recognize familiar voices ...

Cats prefer to get free meals rather than work for them

When given the choice between a free meal and performing a task for a meal, cats would prefer the meal that doesn't require much effort. While that might not come as a surprise to some cat lovers, it does to cat behaviorists. ...

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