The American Naturalist is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1867. It is published by the University of Chicago Press on behalf of the American Society of Naturalists. The journal covers research in ecology, evolutionary biology, population, and integrative biology. As of 2009, the editor-in-chief is Mark McPeek. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 4.736, ranking it 17th out of 130 journals in the category "Ecology" and 10th out of 45 journals in the category "Evolutionary Biology".

Publisher
University of Chicago Press on behalf of the American Society of Naturalists
Country
United States
History
1867–present
Website
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AN/home.html
Impact factor
4.736 (2010)

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Problems with reproduction in birds

In birds and other species alike, pairs can face considerable difficulties with reproduction. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen have now shown in an extensive analysis of 23,000 zebra finch ...

Why rats would win 'Australian Survivor'

Australian rodents skulls all correspond to one simple, size-dependent shape that is more than ten million years old but it turns out this lack of change is the secret behind their survivor reputation.

Male size advantage drives evolution of sex change in reef fish

Some species of fish, notably parrotfish and wrasses living on coral reefs, change their biological sex as they age, beginning life as females and later becoming functionally male. New work from the University of California, ...

Worms discovered in the brain of lizard embryos for the first time

Researchers have discovered nematodes, or worms, in the brains of lizard embryos. This is the first time they have been found in reptile eggs, and it was previously believed that egg laying prevents parasites from being transmitted ...

How gliding animals fine-tuned the rules of evolution

A study of gliding animals has challenged the idea that evolutionary innovations—adaptations that bring new abilities and advantages—spur the origin of other new body types and other characteristics in descendent species. ...

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