The American Naturalist is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1867. It is published by the University of Chicago Press on behalf of the American Society of Naturalists. The journal covers research in ecology, evolutionary biology, population, and integrative biology. As of 2009, the editor-in-chief is Mark McPeek. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 4.736, ranking it 17th out of 130 journals in the category "Ecology" and 10th out of 45 journals in the category "Evolutionary Biology".

Publisher
University of Chicago Press on behalf of the American Society of Naturalists
Country
United States
History
1867–present
Website
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AN/home.html
Impact factor
4.736 (2010)

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How plankton hold secrets to preventing pandemics

Whether it's plankton exposed to parasites or people exposed to pathogens, a host's initial immune response plays an integral role in determining whether infection occurs and to what degree it spreads within a population, ...

Why do some birds lose flight more readily than others?

Back in 2012, Ryan Terrill was hiking down a dry canyon in central Bolivia, looking for Giant Antshrikes—the largest species of antbird—but he found himself, instead, thinking about another bird: the Titicaca Grebe.

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Fall is here, and we see the leaves turning yellow, orange or red thanks to a trick of our vision: our brains categorize colors. Scientists have learned that birds with colorful markings do this too. But what about drab birds ...

Problems with reproduction in birds

In birds and other species alike, pairs can face considerable difficulties with reproduction. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen have now shown in an extensive analysis of 23,000 zebra finch ...

Why rats would win 'Australian Survivor'

Australian rodents skulls all correspond to one simple, size-dependent shape that is more than ten million years old but it turns out this lack of change is the secret behind their survivor reputation.

Male size advantage drives evolution of sex change in reef fish

Some species of fish, notably parrotfish and wrasses living on coral reefs, change their biological sex as they age, beginning life as females and later becoming functionally male. New work from the University of California, ...

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