Researchers solve mystery of disappearing bird digit

Evolution adds and subtracts, and nowhere is this math more evident than in vertebrates, which are programmed to have five digits on each limb. But many species do not. Snakes, of course, have no digits, and birds have three.

Scientists produce first stem cells from endangered species

Starting with normal skin cells, scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have produced the first stem cells from endangered species. Such cells could eventually make it possible to improve reproduction and genetic ...

World's smallest electric motor made from a single molecule

Chemists at Tufts University's School of Arts and Sciences have developed the world's first single molecule electric motor, a development that may potentially create a new class of devices that could be used in applications ...

Fast, cheap, and accurate: Detecting CO2 with a fluorescent twist

Detecting specific gases in the air is possible using a number of different existing technologies, but typically all of these suffer from one or more drawbacks including high energy cost, large size, slow detection speed, ...

Endeavour crater provides possible evidence of past water

(PhysOrg.com) -- The Mars rover Opportunity is a senior citizen, but still spry, and as it peers over the rim of the giant impact crater called Endeavour, it's embarking on what could be called a new mission, say its NASA ...

Toshiba supersized, glasses-free, 3-D TV steals IFA show

(PhysOrg.com) -- Toshiba earlier this week showed off its new no-glasses 55-inch 3-D TV. The company says it is the world’s first large screen 3-D TV that does not require any glasses. According to Toshiba, the new 55ZL2 ...

Linux B-day celebrations rattled by break-in

(PhysOrg.com) -- Just days after celebrations marking the 20th birthday of Linux, the operating system revered around the globe as a rock-solid open source triumph, news surfaced that key servers used to maintain and distribute ...

60% of deforested Amazon used for cattle: study

More than 60 percent of deforested areas of the Brazilian Amazon forest are used for grazing cattle, while only five percent is used for agriculture, a new government study said.

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