Coated Ultrasmall Quantum Dots Suitable for In Vivo Imaging

Quantum dots have shown promise in a variety of imaging and therapeutic applications, particularly when they are coated to render them biocompatible. However, such coating can increase the size of quantum dots signficantly, ...

Serial killers may kill more victims than we think

Serial killers might be responsible for up to 10 times as many U.S. deaths as previously estimated, according to an analysis by a criminologist at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Technique controls nanoparticle size, creates large numbers

In a world that constantly strives for bigger and bigger things, Washington University in St. Louis' Pratim Biswas, Ph.D., the Stifel and Quinette Jens Professor and chair of the Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical ...

Surgical glue

In a few years’ time, instead of fiddling with needle and thread, sur-geons may simply use glue to connect implants to living tissue. They took their idea from mussels, which can stick to any surface, be it porous rock ...

Virtual factory on the tabletop

Many industrial processes involve reactions in places that are difficult to see directly. A novel tabletop touch screen allows hidden sequences of events to be observed in progress. It can be operated intuitively using a ...

New form of compound stimulates research on hydrogen storage

Research on hydrogen-fueled cars may be one step closer to application thanks to a new form of hydride discovered by scientists at the ESRF. The material, lithium borohydride, is a promising energy storage system: it contains ...

New map outlines risk of zebra mussel invasion

The spread of two invasive alien freshwater mussel species – the zebra mussel and the quagga mussel – appears to be controlled in part by calcium levels in streams and lakes and a new risk assessment based on water chemistry ...

Keeping an eye on evolution

University of Queensland research has found the “missing link” in the evolution of the eye.

'Magma P.I.' unearths clues to how crust was sculpted

About a decade ago, Johns Hopkins University geologist Bruce Marsh challenged the century-old concept that the Earth’s outer layer formed when crystal-free molten rock called magma oozed to the surface from giant subterranean ...

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