Archive: 10/10/2005

Few note virtualization's 'stealthy creep'

Virtualization, a concept that replaces the old model of a computer as a single “box” running only its own operating system and storing only its own data in its own format, is likely to revolutionize the IT industry.

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Spin Structure of Protons and Neutrons

Normally, we think of building blocks as static objects. For instance, the brick and mortar used to build the local bank remain pretty much the same from the day it's built to the day it's torn down. But the building blocks ...

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NMR Technology Comes to the Lab on a Chip

A breakthrough in the technology of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), one of the most powerful analytic tools known to science, is opening the door to new applications in microfluidic chips, devices for studying super-tiny ...

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Brain regulates initial stages of sex change in social fish

New findings about how the brain enzyme aromatase influences sex change in social goby fish could help explain the complex interaction among the brain, physiology, and behavior that forms the biological basis of human sexual ...

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Electronic money making headway in Japan

For Tamayo Mikitani, making sure her Suica card is in her bag has become second nature, just like she wouldn't dream of leaving home without her cell phone or her makeup bag.

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Study: Dinosaurs are not birds' ancestors

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill scientists say no good evidence exists to indicate that dinosaurs are the ancestors of modern birds.

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Nokia boss says mobile-phone demand strong

The growth in global mobile-phone demand should continue into next year despite earlier expert predictions of a downturn, the head of Nokia predicted.

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FEMA computers hampered during Katrina

Faulty federal computer networks may have been partly to blame for the government's lackadaisical response to major storms last summer -- and Hurricane Katrina this year, experts tell UPI's Networking.

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