Water ice renders short-lived molecule sustainable

"Antiaromatic compounds" is what chemists call a class of ring molecules which are extremely instable—the opposite of the highly stable aromatic molecules. Because they exist for mere split seconds, they can only be detected ...

Does a competent leader make a good friend?

New research shows that when we elect leaders and politicians we tend to prefer dominant-looking, masculine men, but when we are looking to make new friends we seek the opposite.

ORCA prototype ready for the open ocean

Its name refers to one of the biggest animals in the sea, but ORCA, the Ocean Radiometer for Carbon Assessment instrument, will be observing the smallest.

Study shows global sea ice diminishing, despite Antarctic gains

Sea ice increases in Antarctica do not make up for the accelerated Arctic sea ice loss of the last decades, a new NASA study finds. As a whole, the planet has been shedding sea ice at an average annual rate of 13,500 square ...

FBI probes Newsweek hack following threats

The FBI is investigating the hijacking of Newsweek's Twitter feed Tuesday by pro-Islamic hackers in which a threat was made to President Barack Obama's family, the White House said.

Twitter exec's account fires off spam posts

An official Twitter account for the company's chief financial officer unleashed a barrage of spam posts on Tuesday in what may have been a hack or a glitch.

Too much of a good thing: Extra genes make bacteria lethal

We, as most animals, host many different beneficial bacteria. Being beneficial to the host often pays off for the bacteria, as success of the host determines the survival and spread of the microbe. But if bacteria grow too ...

Earthquake activity linked to injection wells may vary by region

The Williston Basin in north central U.S. produced fewer earthquakes caused by wastewater injection than in Texas, suggesting the link between seismicity and production activities may vary by region, according to a new study ...

Google gives Lick Observatory $1 million

Google Inc. has given $1 million to the University of California's Lick Observatory in what astronomers hope is the first of many private gifts to support an invaluable teaching and research resource for the state.

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