Archive: 1/08/2005

E-waste becoming a health hazard

"E-trash" is creating an increasing health hazard across the nation, with the U.S. Senate trying to find a national solution.

dateAug 01, 2005 in
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Networking: 'Smart highways' emerging

Commuters cruise down Interstate 95 from New York City to Washington, D.C., bumper to bumper, at a speed of 120 miles per hour -- about a two-hour trip at that speed. Do they worry about collisions? Not at all. They can even ...

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Beijing firm says WiMax no threat to 3G

WiMax and 3G technologies will complement, not compete with, each other in China's broadband market, according to Analysys International, a Beijing research firm.

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Climate Is Regulated By Water

About one hundred years ago, S. Arrhenius brought forward a hypothesis that the atmospheric temperature of at the surface of the Earth was increasing under the influence of the glasshouse effect created by carbonic acid gas. ...

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Engineers chart semiconductors on the scale of atoms

Spanning fewer than a thousand atoms, the electronic devices on semiconductor chips have become so miniscule they defy most efforts to characterize them. Now for the first time, engineers have demonstrated a way to image ...

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World First ~ The Walkman™ phones 100

Sony Ericsson announces first global search for the world’s favourite music Do you love driving to the Rolling Stones or dancing to Madonna? Sony Ericsson is compiling ‘The Walkman phones 100’ - the first soundtrack ...

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UniS scientists to investigate the secrets of the universe

The Nuclear Physics Group at the University of Surrey has been awarded a large scale grant worth almost half a million pounds (£483k) from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to synthesise and ...

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Tandem Ions May Lead the Way to Better Atomic Clocks

NIST Detects “Ticks” in Aluminum, with Help from Intermediary Atom Physicists at the Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used the natural oscillations of two different types ...

dateAug 01, 2005 in
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