University of Twente

What happens when a stone impacts on water

Researchers at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the University of Twente in the Netherlands and the University of Seville in Spain have explained the formation and behaviour of the ...

Jan 29, 2009
4.7 / 5 (6) 6

Giant pandas endangered by inbreeding: study

(PhysOrg.com) -- We are all aware that the giant panda is an endangered species. Dutch researchers at the University of Twente’s Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC, The Netherlands) ...

Jan 22, 2010
4 / 5 (7) 0 | with audio podcast

Magnetic spin on non-magnetic materials

(PhysOrg.com) -- Nanotechnologists from the University of Twente's MESA+ and MIRA research institutes have developed a method for incorporating magnetic elements into non-magnetic materials in a highly controlled ...

Feb 14, 2012
4.7 / 5 (6) 0

Janus particles: particles with two faces

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers at the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente, The Netherlands, have devised a method for fabricating Janus particles, so called because, like the Roman ...

Sep 18, 2009
4.5 / 5 (6) 1

More energy from biofuel

Oil produced from biomass - such as wood chips or plant residues - seldom has the same quality and energy content as 'classical' crude oil. A new, simple catalyst, developed at the University of Twente, improves ...

Aug 07, 2014
3.7 / 5 (7) 0

Line dancing bacteria on a chip (w/ Video)

By changing the direction of a magnetic field, so-called magneto-tactic bacteria are able to make a full U-turn. They can be taught line dancing in this way, inside the tiny micro channels of a lab on a chip. ...

Nov 10, 2014
5 / 5 (5) 1

Explosion on chip sets liquid in motion

(PhysOrg.com) -- PhD student, Dennis van den Broek, of the University of Twente, Netherlands, has developed a new type of miniature motor, the micro-bubble actuator. This ‘motor’, which can be used in ...

Oct 30, 2008
4.8 / 5 (5) 1

Nanoparticles for clean drinking water

One way of removing harmful nitrate from drinking water is to catalyse its conversion to nitrogen. This process suffers from the drawback that it often produces ammonia. By using palladium nanoparticles as ...

Jan 16, 2015
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