University College London

Fruit fly antennae are tuned in

(PhysOrg.com) -- The antennal ears of different fruit fly species are actively tuned to high-frequency components of their respective mating songs, according to new research led by University College London ...

Apr 01, 2011
4.5 / 5 (2) 0 | with audio podcast

UCL space missions get the go-ahead

University College London space scientists are involved in two out of four missions that have been selected by the European Space Agency to compete for a launch opportunity at the start of the 2020s.

Mar 03, 2011
3.7 / 5 (3) 1

Mission to extra-solar planets approved

The European Space Agency has backed a £400 million pound mission to study extra-solar planets, led by UCL (University College London). A key objective of the mission is to look for signs of life in planets which are ...

Feb 25, 2011
3 / 5 (4) 4

Tracking neural stem cells

(PhysOrg.com) -- Magnetic nanoparticles could be used to track neural stem cells after a transplant in order to monitor how the cells heal spinal injuries, say UCL scientsts.

Feb 14, 2011
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Simple marine worms distantly related to humans

Two groups of lowly marine worms are related to complex species including vertebrates (such as humans) and starfish, according to new research. Previously thought to be an evolutionary link between simple animals such as ...

Feb 09, 2011
5 / 5 (4) 3 | with audio podcast

Salt found in African, Caribbean foods 'shocking'

(PhysOrg.com) -- Popular dishes from African and Caribbean restaurants in London can contain the same level of salt as that in over 30 packets of ready salted crisps, according to new research which highlights ...

Feb 04, 2011
5 / 5 (1) 1

Rising indoor winter temperatures linked to obesity?

Increases in winter indoor temperatures in the United Kingdom, United States and other developed countries may be contributing to rises in obesity in those populations, according to UCL research published today.

Jan 25, 2011
3.5 / 5 (6) 0 | with audio podcast

Brain's clock influenced by senses

Humans use their senses to help keep track of short intervals of time according to new research, which suggests that our perception of time is not maintained by an internal body clock alone.

Jan 20, 2011
5 / 5 (2) 0 | with audio podcast