SINTEF

SINTEF (Norwegian: Stiftelsen for industriell og teknisk forskning), headquartered in Trondheim, Norway, is the largest independent research organisation in Scandinavia. Every year, SINTEF supports research and development at 2,000 or so Norwegian and overseas companies via its research and development activity. The acronym SINTEF means "The Foundation for Scientific and Industrial Research". SINTEF was established at the Norwegian Institute of Technology (NTH) in Trondheim in 1950 and expanded rapidly in the following years. The largest expansion came in 1993 when the "Centre for Industrial Research" in Oslo merged with SINTEF and created the SINTEF Oslo campus. SINTEF has approximately 2100 (2010) employees, most of whom are located in Trondheim, and approximately 350 of whom are in Oslo. There are also offices in Bergen, Stavanger, Tromsø, Raufoss and Ålesund, in addition to overseas offices in Houston, Texas (USA); Rio De Janeiro, Brazil; and Hirtshals, Denmark (the Hirtshals location being a laboratory installation). SINTEF works in close cooperation with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim and with the University of Oslo (UiO).

Address
Oslo, Norway
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Redundant egg layers can become food

Three million egg-laying hens are destroyed each year. Researchers believe that this practice is inadequately sustainable and want to see the hens exploited for food, oils and proteins.

Mar 20, 2015
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Power companies unprepared for hacking attacks

Researchers are recommending that Norwegian power distribution companies should carry out more regular contingency exercises to prepare themselves for hacking attacks. If they don't, they won't be equipped ...

Mar 19, 2015
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Extracting 'gold' from fish and plant waste

New industrial processing techniques are enabling us to obtain valuable proteins, antioxidants and oils from salmon and rapeseed waste. These extracts can be used in health foods, nutritional supplements ...

Mar 11, 2015
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Running fuel cells on bacteria

Researchers in Norway have succeeded in getting bacteria to power a fuel cell. The "fuel" used is wastewater, and the products of the process are purified water droplets and electricity.

Jan 30, 2015
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Self-repairing subsea material

Embryonic faults in subsea high voltage installations are difficult to detect and very expensive to repair. Researchers believe that self-repairing materials could be the answer.

Dec 16, 2014
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Taking a production well's pulse

Oil companies are having problems finding out how much each of their wells is producing. Researchers believe this can be solved by providing each well with its own frequency.

Dec 12, 2014
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Using robots to get more food from raw materials

Can an industrial robot succeed both at removing the breast fillet from a chicken, and at the same time get more out of the raw materials? This is one of the questions to which researchers working on the ...

Dec 09, 2014
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Robot water pipe inspectors

The company Breivoll Inspection Technologies has only five employees. Nevertheless, it is working closely with Norwegian municipalities and research centres both in Norway and overseas. The reason for the ...

Dec 02, 2014
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