Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLOS) was founded in 2000 by biomedical scientists Harold E. Varmus, Patrick O. Brown and Michael Eisen for the purpose of granting open access to the public about scientific research papers. An open letter was sent to scientific publishers encouraging them to all distribution of their research literature through an on-line publication like the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central. In response to a less than receptive response, PLOS launched a nonprofit scientific and medical publishing venture in 2003. PLOS articles are available free on-line and appear immediately on the web site for no charge. PLOS received start-up funds from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundations and has received various other foundation endowments for their not for profit enterprise.

Address
185 Berry Street, Suite 3100 San Francisco, CA 94107 USA
E-mail
press@plos.org
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Whale shark fringe migration

At the fringe of the whale shark range, the volcanic Azore islands may play an increasing role for the north Atlantic population as sea surface temperatures rise, according to a study published July 16, 2014 in the open-access ...

dateJul 16, 2014 in Plants & Animals
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Finding elusive emperor penguins

Field surveys and satellites complement each other when studying remote penguin populations, according to research published June 25 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by André Ancel from the CNRS at Strasbourg and colleagues.

dateJun 25, 2014 in Plants & Animals
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New app collects wildlife-vehicle collision data

A new app used to report wildlife-vehicle collisions increased efficiency and accuracy when compared to manual methods, according to a study published June 4, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Daniel Olson from ...

dateJun 04, 2014 in Software
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Cheating favors extinction

Cooperative behaviour is widely observed in nature, but there remains the possibility that so-called 'cheaters' can exploit the system, taking without giving, with uncertain consequences for the social unit as a whole. A ...

dateApr 30, 2013 in Evolution
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