Oxford University

Feast clue to smell of ancient Earth

Tiny 1,900 million-year-old fossils from rocks around Lake Superior, Canada, give the first ever snapshot of organisms eating each other and suggest what the ancient Earth would have smelled like.

Apr 29, 2013
4.4 / 5 (7) 1 | with audio podcast

Quantum cellmates with noisy networks

These components, called quantum bits, are fragile and susceptible to outside interference, making them easier to control when isolated in cells of four. Now scientists from Oxford and Singapore report in ...

Apr 25, 2013
5 / 5 (5) 0

Hide and seek with a quantum compass

How would you look for something that can be in two 'places' at once? The answer, according to Oxford University research into a quantum phenomenon called superposition, seems to be to ask where it isn't ...

Mar 11, 2013
4.4 / 5 (10) 16 | with audio podcast

Caves point to thawing of Siberia

Evidence from Siberian caves suggests that a global temperature rise of 1.5 degrees Celsius could see permanently frozen ground thaw over a large area of Siberia, threatening release of carbon from soils, ...

Feb 21, 2013
3.6 / 5 (10) 8 | with audio podcast

How the daffodil got its trumpet

The daffodil is one of the few plants with a 'corona', a crown-like structure also referred to as the 'trumpet'. New research suggests that the corona is not an extension of the petals as previously thought, ...

Feb 20, 2013
5 / 5 (1) 0

Models move from brain to rain

(Phys.org)—One of climate scientists' key ambitions is to predict future climate change more accurately. They create incredibly detailed computer models, but even these cannot calculate all the infinite ...

Feb 07, 2013
3 / 5 (5) 4 | with audio podcast

Routes towards defect-free graphene

A new way of growing graphene without the defects that weaken it and prevent electrons from flowing freely within it could open the way to large-scale manufacturing of graphene-based devices with applications ...

Feb 01, 2013
4.9 / 5 (12) 12 | with audio podcast