National Physical Laboratory

Graphene joins the race to redefine the ampere

A new joint innovation by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the University of Cambridge could pave the way for redefining the ampere in terms of fundamental constants of physics. The world's first ...

May 12, 2013
4.7 / 5 (17) 7 | with audio podcast

A 'quantum leap' in encryption technology

Toshiba Research Europe, BT, ADVA Optical Networking and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the UK's National Measurement Institute, today announced the first successful trial of Quantum Key Distribution ...

Apr 24, 2014
4.3 / 5 (11) 0

Watching nanoscale assembly live

Ebola virus, Alzheimer's amyloid fibrils, tissue collagen scaffolds and cellular cytoskeleton are all filamentous structures that spontaneously assemble from individual proteins.

Jan 05, 2015
5 / 5 (3) 0

A new model for quantum noise

The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has published research in Nature Communications that updates one of the most fundamental concepts in the physics of quantum electronic devices - the standard tunnel ...

Jun 18, 2014
4.5 / 5 (6) 2

Quantum model helps solve mysteries of water

A research team from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the University of Edinburgh and IBM's TJ Watson Research Center has revealed a major breakthrough in the modelling of water that could shed light ...

Jun 04, 2013
4.8 / 5 (8) 3 | with audio podcast

Cold atoms for quantum technology

Researchers from the National Physical Laboratory, University of Strathclyde, Imperial College London and University of Glasgow have developed a portable way to produce ultracold atoms for quantum technology ...

May 08, 2013
4.9 / 5 (10) 0 | with audio podcast

New nanodevice builds electricity from tiny pieces

(Phys.org) -- A team of scientists at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and University of Cambridge has made a significant advance in using nano-devices to create accurate electrical currents. Electrical ...

Jul 06, 2012
4.8 / 5 (9) 0 | with audio podcast