Lund University

Lund University (Swedish: Lunds universitet) is one of Europe's most prestigious universities and Scandinavia's largest institutions for education and research, frequently ranked among the world's top 100 universities. The university, located in the city of Lund in the province of Scania, Sweden, traces its roots back to 1425, when a Franciscan studium generale was founded in Lund next to the Lund Cathedral, making it the oldest institution of higher education in Scandinavia followed by studium generales in Uppsala in 1477 and Copenhagen in 1479. The current university was founded in 1666 after Sweden had won Scania in the 1658 peace agreement with Denmark. Lund University has eight faculties, with additional campuses in the cities of Malmö and Helsingborg, with 47,266 students in more than 274 different programmes and 2000 separate courses. It belongs to the League of European Research Universities as well as the global Universitas 21 network.

Address
Paradisgatan 2, Lund, Skåne, Sweden
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New carbon accounting method proposed

Established ways of measuring carbon emissions can sometimes give misleading feedback on how national policies affect global emissions. In some cases, countries are even rewarded for policies that increase ...

dateMar 10, 2015 in Environment
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Extra-short nanowires best for brain

If in the future electrodes are inserted into the human brain - either for research purposes or to treat diseases - it may be appropriate to give them a 'coat' of nanowires that could make them less irritating for the brain ...

dateJan 15, 2015 in Bio & Medicine
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Do viruses make us smarter?

A new study from Lund University in Sweden indicates that inherited viruses that are millions of years old play an important role in building up the complex networks that characterise the human brain.

dateJan 12, 2015 in Cell & Microbiology
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Nano-forests to reveal secrets of cells

Vertical nanowires could be used for detailed studies of what happens on the surface of cells. The findings are important for pharmaceuticals research, among other applications. A group of researchers from ...

dateSep 02, 2014 in Bio & Medicine
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Toothpaste fluorine formed in stars

The fluorine that is found in products such as toothpaste was likely formed billions of years ago in now dead stars of the same type as our sun. This has been shown by astronomers at Lund University in Sweden, ...

dateAug 21, 2014 in Astronomy
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Sun's activity influences natural climate change

For the first time, a research team has been able to reconstruct the solar activity at the end of the last ice age, around 20,000-10,000 years ago, by analysing trace elements in ice cores in Greenland and cave formations ...

dateAug 18, 2014 in Earth Sciences
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Smart bacteria help each other survive

The body's assailants are cleverer than previously thought. New research from Lund University in Sweden shows for the first time how bacteria in the airways can help each other replenish vital iron. The bacteria thereby increase ...

dateAug 05, 2014 in Cell & Microbiology
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Fish more inclined to crash than bees

Swimming fish do not appear to use their collision warning system in the same way as flying insects, according to new research from Lund University in Sweden that has compared how zebra fish and bumblebees avoid collisions. ...

dateMay 28, 2014 in Plants & Animals
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