Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

The Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical institutions in the world, where scientists carry out a broad program of research in astronomy, astrophysics, earth and space sciences, and science education. The center's mission is to advance knowledge and understanding of the universe through research and education in astronomy and astrophysics. The center was founded in 1973 as a joint venture between the Smithsonian Institution and Harvard University. It consists of the Harvard College Observatory and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. The center's main facility is located between Concord Avenue and Garden Street, with its mailing address and main entrance at 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Beyond this location there are also additional satellite facilities elsewhere around the globe. The current director of the CfA, Charles R. Alcock, was named in 2004. The director from 1982 to 2004 was Irwin I. Shapiro.

Address
60 Garden St., Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Retrieving an asteroid

(Phys.org) —Asteroids (or comets) whose orbits bring them close to the earth's orbit are called near Earth objects. Some of them are old, dating from the origins of the solar system about four and one-half ...

Dec 27, 2013 4.9 / 5 (32) 60 | with audio podcast

Making the first stars

(Phys.org) —The first stars in the Universe are believed to have formed only a few hundred million years after the big bang, about 13.7 billion years ago. They heated and ionized the pristine intergalactic ...

Nov 18, 2013 4 / 5 (9) 2 | with audio podcast

Old young stars

(Phys.org) —The early stages of a star's life are critical both for the star and for any future planets that might develop around it. The process of star formation, once thought to involve just the simple ...

Nov 11, 2013 5 / 5 (9) 2 | with audio podcast

Tilted suns

(Phys.org) —The Earth's axis of rotation is tilted 23.4 degrees to its orbital motion around the Sun (more precisely, its spin axis has a tilt of 23.4 degrees with respect to the axis of its orbit). This ...

Nov 04, 2013 4.8 / 5 (12) 0 | with audio podcast

Runaway binary stars

CfA astronomers made a remarkable and fortuitous discovery in 2005: an extremely fast moving star, clocked going over three million kilometers an hour. It appears to have been ejected from the vicinity of ...

Oct 07, 2013 4.8 / 5 (12) 0 | with audio podcast

Galaxy winds

(Phys.org) —The most luminous galaxies in our universe are not particularly bright in the visible. Most of their energy output (which can be hundreds or even thousands of times more than our Milky Way's) ...

Sep 23, 2013 4.8 / 5 (5) 1 | with audio podcast