Duke University

Magnetic nano-'shepherds' organize cells

The power of magnetism may address a major problem facing bioengineers as they try to create new tissue -- getting human cells to not only form structures, but to stimulate the growth of blood vessels to nourish that growth.

dateMar 31, 2009 in Bio & Medicine
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When things get glassy, molecules go fractal

Colorful church windows, beads on a necklace and many of our favorite plastics share something in common—they all belong to a state of matter known as glasses. School children learn the difference between liquids and gases, ...

dateApr 24, 2014 in Condensed Matter
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How Mercury Becomes Toxic In The Environment

(PhysOrg.com) -- Naturally occurring organic matter in water and sediment appears to play a key role in helping microbes convert tiny particles of mercury in the environment into a form that is dangerous to most living creatures.

dateAug 18, 2009 in Environment
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'Molecular levers' may make materials better

(Phys.org)—In a forced game of molecular tug-of war, some strings of atoms can act like a lever, accelerating reactions 1000 times faster than other molecules. The discovery suggests that scientists could use these molecular ...

dateDec 23, 2012 in Materials Science
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Hypothetical questions can influence behavior

(PhysOrg.com) -- With the election cycle now underway, many Americans will be responding to political polls about who they support in the races for president and other offices. But can the poll questions themselves influence ...

dateSep 20, 2011 in Social Sciences
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Creating nanostructures from the bottom up

Microscopic particles are being coaxed by Duke University engineers to assemble themselves into larger crystalline structures by the use of varying concentrations of microscopic particles and magnetic fields.

dateApr 24, 2012 in Nanophysics
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