Brefs: Meru improves wireless LAN security

Jan 18, 2006

Software from a Silicon Valley firm is being billed as the first wireless security solution able to function at the radio-frequency level.

Meru Networks says its Security Services Module will be a boon to government agencies and private companies with sensitive security needs that currently shy away from wireless Local Area Networks and Voice over Internet Protocol services.

The system uses a combination of micro scanning, scrambling and radio jamming to prevent eavesdropping on wireless transmissions. Micro scanning allows the inspection of packets and channels for security violations without delaying or interrupting the traffic itself.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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